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Prime Metroid Fanart

18. May 2008 // Comment // Filed under: ,

Super Mario Bros. and The Legend of Zelda are Nintendo’s two most popular icons, and biggest cash cows. Imagine if you could take the best of these two franchises and create a third, powerful entity. Oh, wait, they did that already. The lovechild’s name was Metroid, and the resulting iconic character was Samus Aran.

The original Metroid came out in 1986 in Japan and one year later in the U.S.. The game gained notoriety after it was revealed in the games ending that the character you played as was a woman. Nintendo went so far as to refer to Samus as being male in the English instruction booklet. At a time before the Internet, you either overheard the secret in the cafeteria at lunchtime, or experienced the surprise for yourself.

Metroid II for the Game Boy was a bit smaller and more linear, but still was not a bad game by any means. I think gamers expected a possible step down for any NES sequel made for the Game Boy, and mentally prepared for it. But nothing prepared us for the leap that Super Metroid made on the SNES. To most, it’s the quintessential 2-d sidescroller, and one of, if not the best SNES game.

However, one has to wonder what happened to Metroid in the Nintendo 64 era. Miyamoto stated: “through the entire Nintendo 64 period we were thinking of ways to produce a new Metroid title. We couldn’t come up with any concrete ideas or vehicle at that time.” For a game franchise with such a clean record (yes, including the Metroid Prime series dispute), it may have been for the best that Metroid 64 never saw the light of day. The 64 era was the gawky preteen era of 3-d games, and Nintendo 64 graphics have not aged as well as many thought. Neither have many of the game’s implementation of 2-d gameplay mechanics in a 3-d world. Mario 64 has lost many fans who were taken in by the novelty of Nintendo franchises in 3-d, and nothing else. Luckily, Ocarina of Time still stands as a beacon of hope for the Nintendo 64’s legacy. With that said, I feel it would have been more difficult to translate a Metroid game into a 64 game. For the legacy of the Metroid series, it was a smart to allow 3-d graphics to ripen before releasing a 3-d Metroid. Despite the debate over whether the Prime series consists of “real” Metroid games, many haters agree that if you take the “Metroid” name out of the picture, they still remain solid games.

If Nintendo continues to release 2-d Metroid games along with any 3-d titles, who can complain? 3-d or not, Samus lives on in the hearts and minds of the fans, as the following fanart is proof of.


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James Mason


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Chris Butler


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Al Gonzales


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Luis Gonzalez


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Nicole Sheree Dubois


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AND-3


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Adam Vehige


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ShadowWalkerInc

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Mega Manboy

22. April 2008 // Comment // Filed under: ,

Everyone knows that Mega Man’s Japanese name is Rock Man. Without knowing the secondary characters’ Japanese names, some people don’t know that its Rock – as in Rock n’ Roll (Roll, being his hot sister’s name). Both names are fitting. To think that “Mighty Kid” and “Knuckle Kid” were considered. Then again, he is a kid, or atleast he looks like one. We have all seen what Mega Man looks like as a “man.”

Mega Man never looked so bad! Well, he almost has. It seems poor interpretations of the game art and theme wasn’t limited to the U.S. release. The European boxart was a closer match. But they went downhill with Mega Man 2, what happened? Who is that silver guy with a giant vibrator for an arm? Everything started to improve with MM3, a little. I think we all would have been better off with the original famicon boxart. Or better yet, any of these:


The boxart that should have been.

By darkwickus


Oh so herioc.

By Neolucky


Looking a little neurotic.

By Kyle A. Carrozza


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By Ethan, a.k.a Shouren


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By Vidar Cornelius


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By Ivan Escalante Victoria


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By Steve Emond


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By glauco , a.k.a. t-wong


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By Slip

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Luigi Is Missing!

13. April 2008 // Comment // Filed under: ,

Luigi started off as Mario’s twin – in almost every characteristic they were identical. In the original Mario Bros. title, and in the following Super Mario Bros. NES game, the only perceivable difference between the two was their clothing color. This was obviously due to graphical limitations of the time.

We all remember Luigi as the taller, greener brother who could achieve some serious air time in Super Mario Bros. 2 (the 1988 Doki Doki Panic version). Many don’t realize that the real Super Mario Bros. 2 (the 1986 Lost Levels version) was where Luigi originally began to differentiate himself from Mario with high jumps and long hang time.

The American Super Mario Bros. 2 is often seen as the black sheep of the series, not unlike Zelda II: The Adventure of Link. They are also similar because, despite their black sheep status, they introduced key elements that would remain in each series. For Zelda II it was the magic meter and Dark Link. For SMB2, it was the character designs of the main heroes. Luigi and Princess Peach have changed very little since the game debuted. Luigi’s animation and design was the first step toward his current cowardly persona. His kicking legs and high pitched voice makes him less heroic and less appreciated than his older brother. Games starring Luigi, such as Luigi’s Mansion, make him out to be Nintendo’s most abused character. Fans have taken note of this though. We do what we can to give Luigi back his balls.


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By Justin Coffee


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By DrChrissy


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By Sir-Heartsalot


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By Warren Blakely


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By Andrew Dickman


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By Dirk Erik Schulz , a.k.a. Themrock


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By ChetRippo


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By Jeremy Treece

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Ice Climbers Love Vegetables

1. April 2008 // Comment // Filed under: ,

Ice Climber seems like a forgotten Nintendo franchise. Some wouldn’t even call them a franchise. They have many more cameo appearances than they do actual games. The two climbers, Popo and Nana, actually predate the Super Mario Bros. debut by several months (unless you include the original Mario Bros. arcade game), but never came close to reaching Mario’s status.

Thus, few know the unforgettable journey of those two ice climbers, who scaled 32 platforms of a mountain to retrieve the village vegetables from a giant bird. With that said, it’s strange that the final enemy is sometimes a polar bear with sunglasses and pink shorts.

Another interesting note: this game originally had seals as an enemy, but this was later changed to yetis. Bashing seals was seen as some sort of cruelty to animals. I suppose they preferred to see children slaughter the more human-like yeti and anthropomorphic bipedal bear.

With the inclusion of these two tiny aplinists in the highly praised Super Smash Bros. series, there may be hope in seeing a new Ice Climber game. The new Super Smash Bros. Brawl has been hailed as one of the best Nintendo games ever, let alone just on the Wii. We are still experiencing a spike in 2d games, as well as the recent throwback to earlier Nintendo titles on the DS. It may well be possible we will see the Ice Climbers again in the near future. Or maybe not. So as usual, here’s some Ice Climber fanart to numb the pain.


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By pinkx2


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By CoS-childofsin


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By Brad Elkins


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By Ben Boling


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Popo: vananovion

Nana: Brothershinto

Picture: Kiwi


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By Kevichan


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By SigurdHosenfeld


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By Mark Kelly a.k.a. fryguy64

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StarFox's Super FX Art

26. March 2008 // Comment // Filed under: ,

Originally released in 1993, StarFox was a relative latecomer in the list of Nintendo’s most popular franchises. This did not keep Fox McCloud from being one of the more bad ass Nintendo characters, almost as bad ass as Samus. I guess only a few rounds of SSBB can solve that one!

Fox lead the Star Fox team, which included one infamously obnoxious toad Slippy, and eventually a young vixen, ill-fittingly named Krystal. Maybe because she first appeared in StarFox Adventures, which was originally a non StarFox game called Dinosaur Planet. That couldn’t have stopped them from giving her a more ironic name, congruent with the rest of the characters.

Starfox sported the Super FX chip. This allowed polygon rendering capabilities, and was used to render hundreds of polygons on screen at once. With all this attention to 3D graphics however, the actual character graphics took a backseat role. I for one always wanted to see a little more of Fox and his team, other than the 4 portraits and a few between-level pictures. Luckily, now we have more recent StarFox games. We also have sweet fanart for those who still suffer from withdrawal, even after 5 hours of playing as Fox in SSBB.


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By t-bone-0


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By Wil Overton


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By Daltair


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By themie


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By Ben a.k.a. Makkon


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By Daniel Walton

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